Direct-to-Tape Recording Company “The pleasant feel of a live recital” Since 1979: Audiophile quality organ, classical, & other fine recordings


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Older DTR recordings mastered on open reel are now available in extremely high quality digital formats from High Definition Tape Transfers.  Many DTR titles are already available.  Click the logo below for more information

Keyboard Chamber Music Pipe Organ Christmas/Choral/Etc.

CDs by Category

Piano, harpsichord, etc, excluding organ.  Also see  Chamber Music


Various instruments, ranging from solo performances to chamber groups.


Pipe organs & with orchestr.  Also look under Christmas/Choral/Etc

Choral  & Christmas and others such as the live recording of pop/folk music at the Bethlehem Musikfest.



High Definition Digital Versions of older DTR Recordings Now Available!

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Reviews published in the February 2014 issue of The Source, a publication of the New Jersey Audio Society.  (http://www.njaudiosociety.com/)  

    Written by George Wittershein, who also wrote these overall comments:

   If you listen to Bob Sellman's DTR CDs –I did, and I’m glad I did – you’ll hear the kind of results we audiophiles are always hoping for…and not always getting. His discs provide a generous soundstage, good but not technological-sounding imaging, an open, airy, spacious, natural feeling; and plenty of room ambience.  I’ve had a chance to try a number of Bob’s CDs in my home system, and they all sounded  terrific!


    The Wister Quartet (DTR9501): I have to tell you I loved it.  The “Sellman sound” is irresistible: the instruments really sound like they’re made of wood, which doesn’t always happen with Red Book CD, and they’re nicely placed in a realistic “image.” Dynamics, macro and micro are also well-nigh irresistible.  Bob Sellman’s recording in the Carmel Presbyterian Church, in Glenside, Pennsylvania does the works more than justice.  You can really hear what the composers were aiming for, and I for one was most pleased.

    Frederick Delius: Piano Music (DTR3056): Pianist Charles Abramovic seems to have this little-known repertoire firmly under control, and gives the works as good a reading as they could :hope for.  Add that “Sellman sound”, and you’ve got a winner.

    Invitation to the Music of George Rochberg (DTR3056): Sellman’s CD does in fact serve as an excellent invitation to the composer. It includes a worthwhile spoken word essay on Rochberg by Temple University professor Therese Dolan, a track of solo violin caprices, and some evocative works for flute and harp; harp; and violin & cello. The excellent “Sellman sound” alone is worth the price of the disc, and I for one enjoyed the music

    Philadelphia Gothic (DTR2011): Bob Sellman is also a crackerjack recording engineer when it comes to the organ. Sellman’s wizardry again captures the space of the “Hall”, or rather church, to perfection. It’s another winner!

    Concerts at Carmel: Illuminations  (DTR2002): This recording features a rousing Toccata Joyeuse for organ by composer Daniel Barta, Brahms’ dropdead gorgeous Clarinet Quintet, and a setting of medieval songs called “Illuminations”  You should especially hear the true-to-life sound of the clarinet in the Brahms! This is in the same sonic league as the Stereophile recording of the work. Yes, Bob Sellman is that good.

    As for the question, “Why would you listen to Red Book CDs in the age of high-resolution files?” I have an answer: “You wouldn’t, unless they’re this good!”